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Tag Archives: fairy tale retellings

 Cress (The Lunar Chronicles #3)

*Warning! If you haven’t read the first two books of this series, you probably want to avoid reading the synopsis and review as they contain spoliers for the first two books.

cressPages: 550

Publisher: Feiwel & Friends

Date Published: February 4, 2014

Synopsis from Goodreads: 

Rapunzel’s tower is a satellite. She can’t let down her hair—or her guard. 

In this third book in the bestselling Lunar Chronicles series, Cinder and Captain Thorne are fugitives on the run, with Scarlet and Wolf in tow. Together, they’re plotting to overthrow Queen Levana and her army. 

Their best hope lies with Cress, who has been trapped on a satellite since childhood with only her netscreens as company. All that screen time has made Cress an excellent hacker—unfortunately, she’s just received orders from Levana to track down Cinder and her handsome accomplice. 

When a daring rescue goes awry, the group is separated. Cress finally has her freedom, but it comes at a high price. Meanwhile, Queen Levana will let nothing stop her marriage to Emperor Kai. Cress, Scarlet, and Cinder may not have signed up to save the world, but they may be the only ones who can.

— 

Clocking in at 550 pages, Cress is full of nail-biting adventures.

Cress’s story gives readers a perspective from the mind of a Lunar citizen, which answers some questions I didn’t even think to be asking.

Her shy and naive nature combined with her loyalty and resourcefulness make Cress an asset to our other beloved heroes: Cinder, Scarlet, Wolf, Captain Thorne, and Iko. Reading Cress’s tale was more exciting than Cinder’s and even Scarlet’s, perhaps because the stakes are higher.

It’s no secret I like big books. Cress has new mysteries and finally some answers. I still don’t completely see where the overall story is going . Cress made progress in the overall story arc, but not enough to be really satisfying.

Cinder and her crew continue to play a huge role in the books, and while the shifting POV helps put some events in perspective, I wish the narrative would focus only on the featured character.

On to the romance! It is pretty scarce in Cress because fighting evil mind controllers doesn’t leave a lot of free time, but it still manages to be sweet and hopeful.

In the end, Cress was entertaining and delivered a well thought out story. I am eager to see how Meyer ties everything together in the next installments. Meyer has written a novel that you’ll want to read all at once. She’s answered just enough questions, yet left a large amount of suspense to make readers want Winter immediately. 


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Rags & Bones: New Twists on Timeless Tales

Expected Publication: October 22, 2013  Rags&Bones 

Summary (from Goodreads)

The best writers of our generation retell the classics.The best writers of our generation retell the classics.

Literature is filled with sexy, deadly, and downright twisted tales. In this collection, award-winning and bestselling authors reimagine their favorite classic stories, ones that have inspired, awed, and enraged them; ones that have become ingrained in modern culture; and ones that have been too long overlooked. They take these stories and boil them down to their bones, and then reassemble them for a new generation of readers.

Today’s most acclaimed authors use their own unique styles to rebuild these twelve timeless stories:

Sir Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene – Saladin Ahmed

W. W. Jacobs’s “The Monkey’s Paw” – Kelley Armstrong

Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s “Carmilla” – Holly Black

“Sleeping Beauty” – Neil Gaiman

The Brothers Grimm’s “Rumpelstiltskin” – Kami Garcia

Kate Chopin’s The Awakening – Melissa Marr

Rudyard Kipling’s “The Man Who Would Be King” – Garth Nix

Henry James’s “The Jolly Corner” – Tim Pratt

E. M. Forster’s “The Machine Stops” – Carrie Ryan

Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto – Margaret Stohl

William Seabrook’s “The Caged White Werewolf of the Saraban” – Gene Wolfe

Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Birth-Mark” – Rick Yancey

And six illustrations by Charles Vess

Fairy tale retellings are some of my favorites, and these are some of my most adored authors. What is not to love about this combination? I am intrigued to see how these retellings will turn out. 

Have you read any of these authors or original tales? Which tale do you want to see retold? 



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